Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1524
Title: Understanding the Role of Inflammasomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Authors: Makkar R
Behl T
Bungau S
Kumar A
Arora S.
Keywords: CARD
NLR family
inflammasomes
innate immunity
pannus formations
rheumatoid arthritis.
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Springer
Abstract: Inflammasomes are the molecular pathways that activate upon conditions of infection or stress and trigger the activation and maturation of inflammatory cytokines. Immune reactions in conjugation with inflammatory processes play a pivotal role in developing innumerable diseases. An over reactive immune system fabricates many allergic and hypersensitive reactions in response to autoantibodies activated against modified self-epitopes and similar molecules. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune inflammatory disorder commencing with inflammation in small joints like hands, knees, and wrist eventually entrapping larger joints such as spine. The formation of autoantibodies called rheumatoid factor (RF) and citrullinated proteins against immunoglobulin G symbolizes autoimmune nature of the disease. The presence of autoantibodies embarks principal diagnostic hallmark of the disease. With the advancement of technology, the therapeutic approach is also advancing. A new era of molecules, namely inflammasomes, are activated upon infection or in response to stress and trigger the activation of various proinflammatory cytokines such interleukins which engage in the defense mechanism of the innate immunity. Robust linking among the activity of dysregulated inflammasomes and the heritable acquired inflammatory diseases and disorders emphasizes the significance of this pathway in altering the immune responses. The current review highlights the functioning of inflammasomes and their possible role in disease dysregulation.
URI: 10.1007/s10753-020-01301-1
http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1524
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