Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1474
Title: Insights into the role of endostatin in obesity
Authors: Nijhawan P
Makkar R
Gupta A
Arora S
Garg M
Behl T.
Keywords: Obesity
Endostatin
Angiogenesis
PPAR?
Adipogenesis
VEGF
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Abstract: Objective The role of endostatin has come out as an emerging remedy in control and treatment of numerous metabolic disorders. This review highlights the intricate role in obesity and its associated complications. Key findings Through recent studies and reports the role of various epigenetic markers in the treatment of obesity has been revealed. Neovascularization and adipogenesis produce various angiogenic factors including leptin, angiopoietins, VEGF (Vascular endothelial growth factor) and TGF-? (Transforming growth factor beta) during expansion of adipose tissue via paracrine signaling pathway, therefore angiogenesis has been recognized as a major therapeutic target of obesity. It has been stated that endostatin has been identified as a potent inhibitor of adipogenesis and dietary-induced obesity. However, the mechanism of endostatin is still unclear but its act on Sam68 RNA in preadipocytes by binding to it and this in turn prevents the interaction of Sam68 to intron 5 in mTOR resulting in decreases the expression of mTOR. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the antiangiogenic property of endostatin prevents obesity and its related metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis and inhibit the combined functions on angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Summary The present review focus on the intrinsic role of endostatin as an emerging remedy in the treatment of obesity and its related complications demonstrating their use in the inhibition of angiogenesis event, adipogenesis and provide protection against the release of angiogenic factors.
URI: 10.1016/j.obmed.2019.100120
http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1474
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